Eco-Tip: Safe Bounce House Bouncing!

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Bounce houses should be fun, not toxic. CEH is working hard to get hazardous lead out of these much-loved play structures but it’s not going to happen overnight. So what do you do about that bounce house birthday party coming up that your kids are so excited about?

CEH doesn’t want to spoil your kids’ or anyone’s bounce house fun—we just want to make sure that everyone is safe from lead threats.

Because there is no way for parents to tell whether a bounce house may have lead or not, parents should act as if any bounce house may have lead.  Sadly, there is no definitive list of “safe” or “dirty” bouncy houses or bounce house companies.  That’s why we’re giving you our best tips for safe bouncing, so:

1.  Kids must wash hands thoroughly with soap and water as soon as possible after bouncing. Before they eat! Just using a sanitizer won’t get rid of the lead. Wiping kids’ hands is better than nothing, but an old-fashioned soap and water wash is best.

2.  Have the kids wash their faces (especially very active kids who like face-planting in the bounce house).

3.  Once you get home (or as soon as possible), have the kids change clothes, and throw their worn clothes right into the wash.

Read New York Times story on our bounce house lawsuit.

Watch the KPIX News video on our sidebar, and read their story here.

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Ali manages the website and coordinates the online communications of CEH. She works with the communications and development staff to create messaging strategies and public education content for CEH’s supporters and online audience. A Bay Area native, Ali attended the University of California, Los Angeles, where she received a B.A. in Sociology and Cultural Studies. This allowed her to live abroad in Argentina, where she studied Latin American history and learned valuable Spanish language skills. Ali is thrilled to be part of an organization that advocates for healthy communities so effectively.